a soccer futbol calcio football news reporting site

Stuart Harper On March - 15 - 2011

Carlo Ancelotti - Grounds for Eternal Optimism?

Tifosi, pundits and bookmakers have it all figured out. Roman Abramovich will dispense with Carlo Ancelotti following Chelsea’s ‘annus horribilis’. Jose Mourinho, disenchanted with Madrid’s political machinations will return to Stamford Bridge; with Carlo free to fulfil his often discussed dream of managing AS Roma.

But can it be that simple for the giallorossi half of the Eternal City?

Here in England Carlo has been well received by media and football following public alike. Despite managing a club which does little to engender respect, the generously proportioned Italian has enjoyed an equally warm and cuddly reception.

Possibly its Carlo’s genial press conferences, infused with humour and accompanied by his famous, ‘dancing eyebrow’? Perhaps ‘Carlito’ strikes a chord in the stands with his ‘crafty’ cigarettes and candid self awareness about his aforementioned size? Could it be that for everything Ancelotti appears to be, Fabio Capello (as in the World Cup losing manager) isn’t? Then again, it could simply be that his palmares demands utter respect?

Whatever the reasons, there’s much to admire about Ancelotti and life in London seems to agree with the Italian tactician - despite recently being dogged by persistent and popular assumption suggesting Carlo will soon be entrusted with Thomas Di Benedetto’s Roman war chest.

By their own storied standards, Chelsea are having a miserable campaign, with ‘only’ the Champions League left to play for. Following last season’s double (FA Cup and Premiership title), much was expected of the capital club’s second term under Ancelotti, but the dreaded ‘sophomore slump’ has all but hexed the blues.

Player indiscretions have not helped a season blighted by a glut of poor results with observers predictably suggesting Abramovich will intervene. For now, the media believe that the ‘sword of Damocles’ still hangs above the Chelsea dugout, having once fallen on Ray Wilkins and almost daily, reporters put together Chelsea’s wrongs and Roma’s plight to make four.

Ancelotti himself is no stranger to indiscretion with infidelity costing him his marriage - as an openly religious man however; maybe Carlo understands the power of redemption and is seemingly able to forgive the likes of John Terry and Ashley Cole, electing to work on reformation in addition to simply formation.

Ancelotti played for some time under Roma’s revered coach Nils Liedholm. Of Liedholm, the once golden boy of calcio, Gianni Rivera, remarked ‘he placed human relationships above everything else’ - maybe Ancelotti, influenced by the doctrines of Catholicism and Liedholm, is content to allow his charges the occasional misdemeanour and thus negate the argument that such behaviour could disenfranchise the coach?

Philanthropy aside, in professional terms Ancelotti’s career has plotted an upward curve. As a manger he has worked under the powerful auspices of Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich, rewarding each for their considerable investment with silverware. Additionally, Ancelotti is accustomed to working with legends such as Zidane and Kaka, Ronaldo and Maldini – in short Carlito has enjoyed a coaching career high on funds and not too short on discernable, playing quality.

Providing Abramovich is patient, there is no reason to assume a poor season and player transgressions should signal the end of Ancelotti’s reign. Seasons passed at the San Siro without a major trophy and providing development can be seen, Abramovich would do well to keep faith with the proven Ancelotti.

Given Carlo’s own personal history and a self confessed penchant for prayer, one assumes the topic of faith is a consistent theme during his Chelsea tenure and if Abramovich keeps the faith, history suggests Carlo will repay it.

As for Ancelotti’s ‘modus operandi’, he only ‘does’ benevolent benefactors and stellar signings – of course Roma fans will argue about Di Benedetto’s €60m transfer fund pledge, but to place into context this amount, Chelsea parted with that figure alone for one player – Fernando Torres. Thus, while not an inconsiderable sum, the prospect of plotting an entire renaissance on this figure may not guarantee to garner Ancelotti’s services.

Furthermore, Carlo is in the midst of a program to transform Chelsea for the long term good. Having taken key backroom staff from AC Milan, Carlo is transforming the Premiership’s training facility at Cobham, Surrey, to replicate the rosseneri’s famed ‘Milan Lab’ – renown for prolonging and rehabilitating the careers of Seedorf, Inzaghi, Beckham and of course Paolo Maldini. With so much to address inside and outside of trigoria, would Carlo drop everything to start from scratch once more and so soon?

Ultimately, Carlo Ancelotti will manage AS Roma, of that there is little doubt - but at the age of 51, Carlo is still a young manager and has no reason to put sentimentality ahead of what he is building at Stamford Bridge. The rebuilding of Roma will take time and while that process takes place, Ancelotti may well see his Chelsea vision come to fruition.

Of course, Carlo is indeed an emotional man who doesn’t forget the past, as evidenced by his generosity towards former teammate Stefano Borgonovo (all profits from Carlo’s autobiography are donated to Borgonovo and his fight with ALS or ‘Lou Gehrig disease’) – and while those traits will one day propel him towards Rome, don’t automatically assume it will be this summer.

For all the emotion, sentimentality and ‘dreams’, there’s a hardened and perennial achiever underneath the affable exterior. While Roma undergo their transition, do not be surprised, (notwithstanding Abramovich’s impatience), if Carlo opts to remain in London to finish what he started.

Roma’s tifosi, pundits and bookmakers have it all worked out. Roman Abramovich will dispense with Carlo Ancelotti following Chelsea’s ‘annus horribilis’, Jose Mourinho, disenchanted with Madrid’s political machinations will return to Stamford Bridge; with Carlo free to fulfil his often discussed dream of managing AS Roma.

But can it be that simple for the giallorossi half of the Eternal City?

Here in England Carlo has been well received by media and football following public alike. Despite managing a club which does little to engender respect, the generously proportioned Italian has enjoyed an equally warm and cuddly reception.

Possibly its Carlo’s genial press conferences, infused with humour and accompanied by his famous, ‘dancing eyebrow’? Perhaps ‘Carlito’ strikes a chord in the stands with his ‘crafty’ cigarettes and candid self awareness about his aforementioned size? Could it be that for everything Ancelotti appears to be, Fabio Capello (as in the World Cup losing manager) isn’t? Then again, it could simply be that his palmares demands utter respect?

Whatever the reasons, there’s much to admire about Ancelotti and life in London seems to agree with the Italian tactician - despite recently being dogged by persistent and popular assumption suggesting Carlo will soon be entrusted with Thomas Di Benedetto’s Roman war chest.

By their own storied standards, Chelsea are having a miserable campaign, with ‘only’ the Champions League left to play for. Following last season’s double (FA Cup and Premiership title), much was expected of the capital club’s second term under Ancelotti, but the dreaded ‘sophomore slump’ has all but hexed the blues.

Player indiscretions have not helped a season blighted by a glut of poor results with observers predictably suggesting Abramovich will intervene. For now, the media believe that the ‘sword of Damocles’ still hangs above the Chelsea dugout, having once fallen on Ray Wilkins and almost daily, reporters put together Chelsea’s wrongs and Roma’s plight to make four.

Ancelotti himself is no stranger to indiscretion with infidelity costing him his marriage - as an openly religious man however; maybe Carlo understands the power of redemption and is seemingly able to forgive the likes of John Terry and Ashley Cole, electing to work on reformation in addition to simply formation.

Ancelotti played for some time under Roma’s revered coach Nils Liedholm. Of Liedholm, the once golden boy of calcio, Gianni Rivera, remarked ‘he placed human relationships above everything else’ - maybe Ancelotti, influenced by the doctrines of Catholicism and Liedholm, is content to allow his charges the occasional misdemeanour and thus negate the argument that such behaviour could disenfranchise the coach?

Philanthropy aside, in professional terms Ancelotti’s career has plotted an upward curve. As a manger he has worked under the powerful auspices of Silvio Berlusconi and Roman Abramovich, rewarding each for their considerable investment with silverware. Additionally, Ancelotti is accustomed to working with legends such as Zidane and Kaka, Ronaldo and Maldini – in short Carlito has enjoyed a coaching career high on funds and not too short on discernable, playing quality.

Providing Abramovich is patient, there is no reason to assume a poor season and player transgressions should signal the end of Ancelotti’s reign. Seasons passed at the San Siro without a major trophy and providing development can be seen, Abramovich would do well to keep faith with the proven Ancelotti.

Given Carlo’s own personal history and a self confessed penchant for prayer, one assumes the topic of faith is a consistent theme during his Chelsea tenure and if Abramovich keeps the faith, history suggests Carlo will repay it.

As for Ancelotti’s ‘modus operandi’, he only ‘does’ benevolent benefactors and stellar signings – of course Roma fans will argue about Di Benedetto’s €60m transfer fund pledge, but to place into context this amount, Chelsea parted with that figure alone for one player – Fernando Torres. Thus, while not an inconsiderable sum, the prospect of plotting an entire renaissance on this figure may not guarantee to garner Ancelotti’s services.

Furthermore, Carlo is in the midst of a program to transform Chelsea for the long term good. Having taken key backroom staff from AC Milan, Carlo is transforming the Premiership’s training facility at Cobham, Surrey, to replicate the rosseneri’s famed ‘Milan Lab’ – renown for prolonging and rehabilitating the careers of Seedorf, Inzaghi, Beckham and of course Paolo Maldini. With so much to address inside and outside of trigoria, would Carlo drop everything to start from scratch once more and so soon?

Ultimately, Carlo Ancelotti will manage AS Roma, of that there is little doubt - but at the age of 51, Carlo is still a young manager and has no reason to put sentimentality ahead of what he is building at Stamford Bridge. The rebuilding of Roma will take time and while that process takes place, Ancelotti may well see his Chelsea vision come to fruition.

Of course, Carlo is indeed an emotional man who doesn’t forget the past, as evidenced by his generosity towards former teammate Stefano Borgonovo (all profits from Carlo’s autobiography are donated to Borgonovo and his fight with ALS or ‘Lou Gehrig disease’) – and while those traits will one day propel him towards Rome, don’t automatically assume it will be this summer.

For all the emotion, sentimentality and ‘dreams’, there’s a hardened and perennial achiever underneath the affable exterior. While Roma undergo their transition, do not be surprised, (notwithstanding Abramovich’s impatience), if Carlo opts to remain in London to finish what he started.

Related Posts with Thumbnails

One Response so far.

  1. Philgatt says:

    Eccellente.

    Very enjoyable read on a highly esteemed manager in today’s game.

    Well done and keep up the good work.

Leave a Reply


italian soccer itunes podcast

Featured Video

Sponsors

  • advertise with SerieAWeekly
  • advertise with SerieAWeekly
  • itunes podcasts
  • SerieALive Italian Serie A Fantasy League
  • soccer sportswear
  • advertise with SerieAWeekly
  • advertise with SerieAWeekly
  • advertise with SerieAWeekly

Twitter updates