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David Schiavone On October - 15 - 2010

The Madness Of Serbia

The shocking scenes in the Italy against Serbia match on Tuesday have been front page news here in the peninsula and across the world, but what many including myself are asking is, why were these scenes allowed to happen? what was nothing done? and what will the repercussions be for Serbia and Italy respectively?

Italy goalkeeper Emilano Viviano was terrified about being hit by one of the flares raining down from the stands which ultimately led to the game being halted and eventually abandoned, “We are sorry the game ended this way. It’s a real shame, for Serbia players too. Dejan Stankovic was crying also,” the goalkeeper told reporters.

“I said I couldn’t stay in goal to see flares come down. I was scared, but I did not want a flare hitting my face.”

Ivan Bogdanov the apparent ringleader of the Serbian ultra’s, and Red Star Belgrade ultra has claimed their behaviour was directed at the Italians but at his own side, “I love my country. I have nothing against Italy, I have it with my team.” he told Sky Sport Italia.

So, what do the Serbs have against their team? Well, it is widely known they are deeply unhappy at the sacking of Radomir Antic last month. The veteran coach is deeply respected and led his country to the World Cup during the summer but it appears was sacked for political reasons within the Serbian FA. The fans have since backed the former coach in a legal dispute with the FA.

So, what do the Serbs have against their team? Well, it is widely known they are deeply unhappy at the sacking of Radomir Antic last month. The veteran coach is deeply respected and led his country to the World Cup during the summer but it appears was sacked for political reasons within the Serbian FA. The fans have since backed the former coach in a legal dispute with the FA.

Attacked before the game was goalkeeper Vladimir Stojkovic, currently plays for Partizan Belgrade. He once played for Red Star Belgrade and was made an honorary member of the club, two months before joining Partizan.

Anyone who knows the level of bad feeling between these two clubs will know, that is something you do not do, something that will only rile the fans who once idolised you. But still it is no excuse for violence of any kind.

Stojkovic though, has since published a statement on the Partizan website, it read:

“I’m glad that what happened on Tuesday is now a thing of the past. I’d like to thank the club and the fans for all their support. Some people have made a big problem out of something that’s completely unimportant and I don’t want to think about that,”

“I want to focus on playing for Partizan. We have some important games coming up and play in the Champions League again next week. I don’t want to get involved in what has happened and want to let the authorities solve the problems that are out there.”

UEFA has started a disciplinary investigation into the incidents that occurred in Genoa but the results of the investigation will not be known until the 28th October. The statement on UEFA’s website contained the following, “Once the full dossier is completed, with the assistance of both the referee and delegate reports, the matter will be put before the independent UEFA Control and Disciplinary Body for further review and possible sanctions.”

“The sanctions that are available to the Control and Disciplinary Body can be found in the UEFA Disciplinary Regulations, edition 2008, Article 14, and range from a reprimand or fine, up to a stadium closure or disqualification from competitions in progress and/or exclusion from future competitions.”

“The proposed date for the meeting of the Control and Disciplinary Body to hear this case is Thursday October 28.”

You’ve seen the pictures, watched the videos, read the news reports… What would you do? Should Italy also be punished for lack of organisation? Should the game be replayed or should Italy be awarded a 3-0 victory?

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2 Responses so far.

  1. McKlaud says:

    Well it seems to me that Italy had no problem with allowing this to happen, which is not a surprise as Serbia is their toughest rival and Italy is not playing that well lately…

  2. Greg says:

    SERBIA

    What should happen:

    Fine + no fans home or away for the rest of qualifications or minimum of 5 games (will effect their FA as far as $ and fans as far as not being able to see their team live). Even though this was a premeditated incident organized by criminals and not actual Serbia’s fans, there need to be drastic consequences.

    Reality:

    I wouldn’t be surprised if they got kicked out of EU2012 qualifiers as you can make a pretty good case for it but I still think that this would be to harsh as the organization fail is what escalated this.

    ITALY

    What should happen:

    Fine + 2 games without fans as the organization was horrible. The amount of weapons and similar artifacts brought into the stands was incredible and was later explained buy the words of the chief of Genoa police who said that they let fans in without any searches as they wanted to get them of the streets as fast as they can. What???? Is he crazy?? It was just pure luck that no one got seriously hurt and shame on Genoa police for endangering every fan in the stadium by allowing this to happen. Proper control and none of this would have happened.

    Reality:

    Fine and that’s it.

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